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Hayes, John Michael, 1919-2008

 

Dates

  • Existence: 1919 - 2008

John Michael Hayes was born on May 11, 1919 in Worcester, Massachusetts. He graduated form Massachusetts State College and began his career as a newspaper reporter. Following service with the US Army during W.W.II, he moved to California where he wrote for such radio dramas as "The Adventures of Sam Spade," "My Favorite Husband" and "Inner Sanctum." His radio work caught the attention of Universal, which hired him a s screenwriter in the early 1950s. His first screen credit was for Budd Boetticher's "Red Ball Express" in 1950. In the spring of 1953, Hayes was handpicked by Alfred Hitchcock to adapt the short story "Rear Window" and his collaboration with Hitchcock lifted him into the world of A-list directors, stars and budgets. He also collaborated with Hitchcock on "To Catch A Thief," "The Trouble with Harry" and the 1956 version of "The Man who Knew Too Much." However, when Hayes challenged Hitchcock over a credit dispute, the relationship came to an abrupt end. He went on to write "Peyton Place" and such 1960s showpieces as "Butterfield 8," "The Children's Hour," "The Carpetbaggers" and "Where Has Love Gone." During the 1970's he wrote mostly for TV, with programs including "Winter Kill," "Nevada Smith," "Adams of Eagle Lake" and "Pancho Barnes." One of his last projects to make it to the screen was the 1998 film "Iron Will." In 1984 Hayes was hired as a visiting Associate Professor of Drama by Dartmouth College where he taught film writing in Dartmouth's film studies program. Nominated twice for an Academy Award for "Rear Window" and "Peyton Place' John Michael Hayes died at the age of 89 on June 28, 1989 in Hanover, New Hampshire .

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

John Hayes papers

MS-711
 Collection
Identifier: MS-711
Overview John Michael Hayes (1919-2008), screenwriter. The collection contains completed screenplays as well as drafts and revisions including drafts and shooting copies for Rear Window, Peyton Place, Harlow, Nevada Smith, and Butterfield 8. Also includes correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to his career.